DC2RVA Roster - Spotlight on Jake Craig, Deputy Manager and Chief Engineer

August 20, 2015

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“Looking back, I remember hearing about the DC2RVA project and just knew that I wanted to be a part of it,” says DC2RVA Deputy Manager and Chief Engineer Jake Craig.

Jake plays an integral role in the overall success of DRPT’s initiatives, with a special focus on the DC2RVA project. Jake was recently promoted to  DRPT’s Director of Engineering and Project Oversight and manages all of the engineering and project oversight functions for DRPT’s major rail and transit projects. For the DC2RVA project, he is responsible for the technical supervision of the conceptual and preliminary engineering tasks and making sure these decisions comply with the project’s purpose and need, stakeholders’ desires, and federal and state requirements. 

Before working for DRPT, Jake was a civil engineering consultant for 15 years. It was early in his career as a consultant that he discovered his passion for rail. After working on rail design and construction projects for a few years over a multi-state territory, he decided to focus on rail because he enjoyed the challenge of the fast learning curve and also had a good mentor, who worked directly for the railroad. Interestingly, Jake later discovered that two of his great grandfathers had also worked in the rail industry.

As Jake sees what it takes to make the DC2RVA project possible, he continues to find himself energized by it every day. “One day you may be discussing archaeological surveys and the next day troubleshooting train schedules to accommodate future inter-city and commuter trains.”

What is the biggest challenge that Jake is ready to tackle as part of the DC2RVA project? “Successfully developing an engineering solution to freight and passenger train conflicts created from, what were once, five competing railroads in Richmond. I enjoy the historic nature of this corridor, and I am glad to have the opportunity to improve a railroad line originally established in the 1830s.”